Rainforest plays a major role in the stability of the climate and the availability of fresh water worldwide. Enormous natural factories, recycling and storing carbon, and producing oxygen, the trees draw up vast amounts of water and release it into the atmosphere as vapour, forming clouds which reflect solar radiation and can travel great distances before falling as rain.

 

When rainforest is replaced by pasture or crops, rainfall is lost from the local water cycle as it runs away too quickly to be stored. The increased run-off causes local flooding, soil erosion and in the longer term drought. Moisture held by a rainforest ecosystem allows slow seepage that fills aquifers, streams and rivers.

Draining land to grow crops unsuited to wet ground causes the peat to subside and decompose as it dries, releasing huge quantities of carbon into the atmosphere. Dried peat burns easily, and the previously sustainable practice by smallholders of clearing small areas with fire (because the peat was wet) now results in season long fires that create smog and many health problems. The depth of the peat soils means that some fires never go out completely and smoulder until the next dry season when they burn again. The subsidence caused by drainage eventually makes the land vulnerable to flooding, and some areas such as the Kampar Peninsula are predicted to become unusable in less than 100 years if development continues at the current rate.

This relentless destruction of habitat brings animals into conflict with Man as they search for food, as well as eradicating whole plant and animal species entirely.

Formerly a wildlife reserve Gunung Leuser was listed as a national park in 1980, but such was the level of deforestation during the 80’s and 90’s that in 1995 the land surrounding the park, referred to as the Leuser Ecosystem, was recognised as being necessary to maintain the biodiversity of the forest. This sounds like progress, but in reality the Leuser Ecosystem is not protected as it consists almost entirely of government forest land, one third of which can be legally logged or cleared for agricultural use.

It is our belief that a network of properly monitored, privately owned reserves on the border of the National Park offers the best opportunity to provide the undisturbed lowland habitat necessary to protect the wildlife of the forest and to deter poachers who are the greatest threat to animals after habitat loss.

According to Unesco, in the last 50 years 50% of the earth’s rainforest has been destroyed.

It is our belief that a network of properly monitored, privately owned reserves on the border of the National Park offers the best opportunity to provide the undisturbed lowland habitat necessary to protect the wildlife of the forest and to deter poachers who are the greatest threat to animals after habitat loss.

There are local owners willing to sell to us and at present prices:

 

  • £3 will buy 10 m2

  • £30 = 100 m2 (1 are)

  • £300 = 1000m2 (10 ares)

  • £3000 = 10,000 m2 (1 hectare)

 

We display the prices like this to show that it is possible for anyone to save a piece of the forest, whatever their income. We offer certificates showing the amount of land purchased for those who want them.

 

Please help us to save the rainforest.

Name of account: Green Life Project

Name of bank: BANK OF SCOTLAND PLC

Account number: 15779960

Sort code: 80-22-60

  • IBAN: GB90BOFS80226015779960
  • SWIFT/BIC: BOFSGBS1SDP